Casualty recording news & views

The items posted here illustrate why transparent, humanising casualty recording is crucial. Although news reports of casualties are a staple of journalism, less frequently explored are the complexities of the recording process, the immediate and long-term benefits of doing it properly and the many harms involved in failing to do so. This collection examines those issues.

Casualty Recording and the Law of Armed Conflict

First published 16th Apr 2014

Professor Susan Breau analyses the recommendations of a joint summary from Every Casualty and AOAV on UN and state casualty recording practice, exploring how casualty recording ensures Member State compliance with the Law of Armed Conflict   more...

Accepting truth, acknowledging loss: casualty records from Katyn to Afghanistan

First published 28th Oct 2013

A lack of transparency surrounding records of casualties in armed conflict continues to hamper reconciliation efforts everywhere from Poland to Afghanistan - even decades after the end of a conflict. The United States refusal to identify or publicly acknowledge drone strike casualties is a worrying continuation of this trend.  more...

Every Casualty and International Law: presentation to the ISMLLW

First published 19th Apr 2013

The Every Casualty team is dedicated to tracking developments in international law relating to casualty recording. On Friday February 15th, we presented on the topic of 'Casualty Recording: Legal Obligations and Current Practice', to the UK National Group of the International Society for Military Law and the Law of War (ISMLLW). more...

The Halabja Project: Uncovering the truth 25 years later

First published 11th Dec 2012

25 years later, the Kurdish Regional Government is still decontaminating  the town of Halabja from the horrific chemical  attacks in 1988 and beginning to uncover the truth behind the attacks. more...

Casualty Recording at the Protection of Civilians Debate

First published 12th Jul 2012

On June 26, 2012 the Security Council met under the Chinese presidency  for the Open Debate on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict (PoC). Some 45 countries spoke during the debate, with a number of them explicitly recognising the need for improved casualty recording practices in armed conflict in their statements. To our knowledge this is the first time that the issue of casualty recording methods has been explicitly raised at the Security Council, and this offers a significant new opportunity for making progress on this issue in collaboration with states and inter-state bodies.
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Presentation: methods research, early impressions

First published 25th Oct 2011

This 15 minute slideshow discusses some preliminary impressions from Oxford Research Group's research to analyse how different organisations worldwide are recording violent deaths from conflict. more...

Drones and the legal obligation to record casualties: presentation by Professor Susan Breau

First published 25th Oct 2011

On Thursday 23 June at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), Oxford Research Group's everycasualty programme launched our major finding that there is a legal obligation to record every casualty of conflict, and that this obligation applies to the drone strikes being conducted in Pakistan and Yemen by the CIA. This is the presentation of Professor Susan Breau, Legal Consultant to everycasualty and Professor of International Law at Flinders University. more...