Casualty recording news & views

The items posted here illustrate why transparent, humanising casualty recording is crucial. Although news reports of casualties are a staple of journalism, less frequently explored are the complexities of the recording process, the immediate and long-term benefits of doing it properly and the many harms involved in failing to do so. This collection examines those issues.

UK Government makes new commitment on casualty recording

First published 2nd Mar 2018

The UK Government has committed itself in future to reporting numbers and non-personal details of civilian casualties admitted to UK military field hospitals during combat operations. more...

UK showed no real interest in monitoring civilian casualties: Iraq Body Count on Chilcot Iraq Inquiry Report

First published 15th Jul 2016

The 7th of July 2016 saw the publication in London of the much-awaited Chilcot Iraq Inquiry Report which set out to “identify lessons that could be learned from the Iraq conflict” for the UK government. CRN member Iraq Body Count (IBC),  has published its response to the report. 
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conflict crn iraq

Iraq civilian deaths have almost doubled every year since 2012, reports Iraq Body Count

First published 7th Jan 2015

A recent press release from Iraq Body Count highlights how civilian casualty figures in Iraq have nearly doubled each year since 2012.  more...

Global Jihad: Counting the Cost - New data from the BBC 

First published 15th Dec 2014

The BBC releases the findings of a project to document every casualty of Jihadism around the world for the month of November more...

'Finding names of dead increasingly difficult': TBIJ and Iraq Body Count 

First published 24th Oct 2014

Podcast: Iraq Body Count's Lily Hamourtziadou and TBIJ's Jack Serle speak with Owen Bennet-Jones on the challenges of casualty recording in conflicts in Iraq and Pakistan more...

The Iraq Sanctions Myth

First published 29th Apr 2013

A piece by Prof.Michael Spagat – advisor to the Every Casualty programme, Spagat highlights the how casualty figures from a few surveys claiming that hundreds of thousands of Iraqi children died under sanctions have been repeated without question in numerous statements from high profile political actors, including statements made by UK and US officials justifying the invasion of Iraq, despite the surveys themselves being discredited.
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Every Casualty presentation at the Royal Society of Medicine

First published 18th Apr 2013

On Friday 12th April, Every Casualty presented at the Royal Society of Medicine Conflict and Catastrophes Forum's Annual Medicine Overseas Conference, 'Research and Response in the Middle of Chaos'. The presentation is summarised here. more...

Press release: The war in Iraq: 10 years and counting

First published 19th Mar 2013

This press release from International Practitioner Network (IPN) member Iraq Body Count, on the 10th anniversary of the invasion of Iraq, draws attention to the human toll of the conflict since 2003 through a statistical overview of its casualties. more...

The Halabja Project: Uncovering the truth 25 years later

First published 11th Dec 2012

25 years later, the Kurdish Regional Government is still decontaminating  the town of Halabja from the horrific chemical  attacks in 1988 and beginning to uncover the truth behind the attacks. more...

Towards the Recording of Every Casualty: Summary of the methods research launch at USIP

First published 6th Nov 2012

In this article originally published on the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) website, USIP comment on the launch of the casualty recording practice research launched at their Washington D.C. headquarters in October 2012, and which they funded. more...

Towards the recording of every casualty: methods research launch at USIP

First published 1st Nov 2012

On October 22, 2012, the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) hosted a roundtable discussion to launch the findings of Oxford Research Group (ORG)'s two year research project into casualty recording practice, which mainly focused on the work of NGOs. The panelists and participants discussed how the recording of conflict casualties is often done by NGOs where there is a lack of official recording. The motivations behind and benefits of casualty recording were also examined by the panelists. more...

AOAV's July 2012 Explosive Violence Monitoring Report

First published 20th Aug 2012

This report, based on casualty records compiled by practitioner network member Action on Armed Violence, highlights the extent and impact of the use of explosive weapons in populated areas, which overwhelmingly affects civilians.  more...

Presentation: why we should document every casualty of conflict, both civilian and combatant

First published 25th Oct 2011

On 9 May 2011, Elizabeth Minor of Oxford Research Group's everycasualty programme made this presentation to Café Diplo, the meeting series of the friends of Le Monde Diplomatique Newspaper in London. Setting the arguments in the context of current and former conflicts, from Libya to Afghanistan, Iraq to Bosnia, Elizabeth demonstrates the social, political and human importance of recording every casualty of conflict as an individual. more...

The challenge of recording civilian casualties in Libya: interview with Hamit Dardagan

First published 25th Oct 2011

In this March 2011 interview on the BBC World Service, Hamit Dardagan of Iraq Body Count and Oxford Research Group's everycasualty programme discusses how the recording of civilian casualties in the context of Libya might be approached. more...