Casualty recording news & views

The items posted here illustrate why transparent, humanising casualty recording is crucial. Although news reports of casualties are a staple of journalism, less frequently explored are the complexities of the recording process, the immediate and long-term benefits of doing it properly and the many harms involved in failing to do so. This collection examines those issues.

Casualty recording as an evaluative capability: Libya and the protection of civilians

First published 28th Mar 2013

In a new paper, Every Casualty examines the relevance of casualty recording to the Protection of Civilians (PoC) framework, using NATO's intervention in Libya as a case study. We argue that the acquisition and analysis of information about casualties needs to be given a clear and fundamental role when drafting Security Council resolutions that mandate protection. more...

Launch event: 'Hitting the Target?' RUSI Whitehall Report, publishing paper from Every Casualty

First published 15th Mar 2013

On Tuesday March 26th, the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) is holding a discussion event to mark the launch of a new 'Whitehall Report': 'Hitting the Target? How New Capabilities Are Shaping International Intervention'. The Whitehall Report publishes a new paper from Every Casualty: 'Casualty Recording as an Evaluative Capability: Libya and the Protection of Civilians'. more...

Libya's government announces significant revision of its own casualty figures

First published 9th Jan 2013

The Libyan Government announced significantly lower figures of people killed during the revolution. more...

Leading by example: The UN Human Rights Council's report on casualties in Libya

First published 20th Mar 2012

Although out of the spotlight, the intervention in Libya remains a point of contention internationally. The publication this month of the UN Human Rights Council's International Commission of Inquiry's second report provides both new information on civilian casualties and a formal call upon NATO to do its share to record them. more...

In strikes on Libya by NATO, an unspoken civilian toll

First published 4th Jan 2012

This New York Times article extends this newspaper's concern for the unaccounted casualties of the Libya intervention more...

Libya counts its martyrs, but the bodies don't add up

First published 25th Oct 2011

This New York Times article, comparing claims by the NTC about the number of casualties of the war in Libya with the current verifiable death toll, draws attention to the tendency of political leaders in conflict to issue round-number casualty totals, which are uncorroborated by any verifiable data. more...

Libya: the toll NATO didn't count

First published 25th Oct 2011

Hamit Dardagan of Iraq Body Count and the everycasualty programme highlights Nato's failure even to attempt a comprehensive accounting of civilian casualties in Libya despite their protection being the stated purpose of the Alliance's intervention. more...

The people on the street document casualties – why can't governments?

First published 25th Oct 2011

John Sloboda of Oxford Research Group's everycasualty programme looks at the citizen led efforts to record and memorialise the dead of the 2011 uprisings in the Arab world, and argues that all war victims deserve that same treatment. more...

Presentation: why we should document every casualty of conflict, both civilian and combatant

First published 25th Oct 2011

On 9 May 2011, Elizabeth Minor of Oxford Research Group's everycasualty programme made this presentation to Café Diplo, the meeting series of the friends of Le Monde Diplomatique Newspaper in London. Setting the arguments in the context of current and former conflicts, from Libya to Afghanistan, Iraq to Bosnia, Elizabeth demonstrates the social, political and human importance of recording every casualty of conflict as an individual. more...

The challenge of recording civilian casualties in Libya: interview with Hamit Dardagan

First published 25th Oct 2011

In this March 2011 interview on the BBC World Service, Hamit Dardagan of Iraq Body Count and Oxford Research Group's everycasualty programme discusses how the recording of civilian casualties in the context of Libya might be approached. more...

After Libya, let us learn to count every casualty of war

First published 20th Oct 2011

The Guardian's Jonathan Steele, who was present at the launch of the Charter for the recognition of every casualty of armed violence at the British Academy on 14 September in London, welcomes the charter and discusses its pertinence to Libya and beyond in the first major op-ed focusing on the charter and the NGOs who back it. more...

The casualties of war: Libya and beyond

First published 20th Oct 2011

The architects of a decade of wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and now Libya devote great efforts to assessing the military aspects of their operations – yet are silent on the human damage. Paul Rogers discusses this damage and the Costs of War project of everycasualty programme advisor, Neta Crawford. more...